NSW Launches Local Grant Funding Applications

It didn’t take long into the new year for the New South Wales Office of Responsible Gambling to open up its first offering of grants. And with $1.5 million open for funding grants in local communities, organizations will be submitting applications before the February 21 deadline.

Notice to Applicants

On January 28, the NSW Office of Responsible Gambling announced that new funding was available to the tune of $1.5 million. The Local Prevention Grants Program is offering the money to support New South Wales communities in projects and programs to prevent and reduce gambling harm.

The grants will be allocated at up to $200,000 per initiative. And applications are being accepted from now through 11:59pm on Friday, February 21, 2020.

The NSW Office of Responsible Gambling is especially seeking applications from organizations that work with Aboriginal communities, culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities, young people, and other at-risk communities.

All applications will be judged by experts in problem gambling and ranked by eligibility and assessment criteria as noted in the program’s guidelines.

Purpose of New Grants

NSW Office of Responsible Gambling Director Natalie Wright noted that the goal of the grants is to raise awareness about gambling harm through community involvement. The organizational support can help members of NSW communities understand gambling risks, potential harms, and encourage informed decision-making when it comes to gambling.

“By supporting community, not-for-profit and other local organizations, these grants can meet local community needs to reduce gambling harm and help stop gambling harm before it occurs,” Wright said.

Examples of organizations eligible for funding include ones that provide educational opportunities, peer support programs, lived-experience speaking programs, and stigma reduction programs. Some of the groups open to apply include:

  • Community and neighborhood centers
  • Sporting clubs
  • Schools and other education providers
  • Youth organizations
  • Charities
  • Councils
  • Non-government organizations
  • Advocacy organizations
  • Providers of mental health and drug and alcohol services and programs
  • Aboriginal community organizations
  • CALD community organizations
  • Local health districts

The money comes from the government’s Responsible Gambling Fund, which advises the government on funds needed to support communities and work to achieve the goal of no gambling harm in NSW.

Examples of Some 2019 Grants

Throughout 2019, the NSW Office of Responsible Gambling distributed large sums of money to a variety of organizations and programs.

In May, five universities were announced to receive portions of $400,000 in grants. Those went to projects at the University of Technology Sydney, Australian National University in Canberra, Central Queensland University, Deakin University in Victoria, and University of Sydney Business School. All demonstrated their plans to use the money for projects regarding bookmaker promotions, youth gambling, female-concerned significant others, and education for young people.

About two months later, NSW sent another $176,400 to the University of Sydney’s Gambling Treatment and Research Clinic to create a self-exclusion website for gambling venues. And Deakin University received another $250,000 to create two online courses about gambling harm.

Toward the end of 2019, the NSW Office of Responsible Gambling announced another new grant opportunity, one for students. Applications opened for students to apply for more than $53,000 per year in PhD scholarship program funding for up to three years. Also, two fellowships were opened for post-doctoral fellowship candidates to encourage them to participate in research partnerships, helping build their careers while aiding in the development of innovative approaches to gambling harm programs.

NSW Public Health Approach

The NSW Office of Responsible Gambling uses a gambling harm prevention continuum in its public health approach to reducing harm. This takes into consideration that an entire community must work together to achieve the greater goals.

The first stage of the continuum is prevention, aimed at the general public. Some of the ways that these interventions can work are:

  • Broad education programs
  • Partnerships
  • Grants
  • Capacity building
  • Community-led action
  • Awareness campaigns

The next stage on the continuum is early intervention for those at risk of experiencing gambling harm but not yet seriously affected. These interventions are to try to risk factors from becoming problems:

  • Targeted education programs
  • Partnerships
  • Grants
  • Capacity building
  • Community-led action
  • Awareness campaigns

Finally, when people arrive at the stage of experiencing the effects of problem gambling, there are more serious interventions on tap:

  • Awareness campaigns
  • Partnerships
  • Lived-experience programs
  • Services and support

NSW encourages those with organizations that can be a part of the proactive process of addressing gambling harm, especially in the middle section of the above continuum, to apply for grants.

While there is only one month of an application window open for this round of funding, more opportunities will likely arise throughout the year as funds become available. More information about the general Responsible Gambling Fund is available on the website, complete with strategic plans, reports, and funds available.

 

 

Rose Varrelli

Rose Varrelli has always been passionate about online casinos, as she's been a player at a variety of places for years. Rose turned her personal knowledge and insight into a writing career. She aims to provide readers with the most up to date, informative news in the world of online casinos!

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